‘America’s Next Top Model’ contestant Jael Strauss dead at 34 after stage 4 breast cancer diagnosis – Fox News

Former “America’s Next Top Model” contestant Jael Strauss has died two months after revealing she was diagnosed with Stage 4 breast cancer, Fox News can confirm. She was 34.

“I just want to share that Jael lived a full life and loved everyone she met unconditionally,” a close friend of Strauss told Fox News on Tuesday.

“She was a friend to all and helped hundreds of people find freedom from the pain of addiction,” Strauss’ friend continued. “She was an advocate for those who were most in need of support. Her love and care knew no bounds and she was, simply put, one of the most incredible people I’ve ever known.

“She greatly impacted all those who crossed her path.”

According to TMZ, citing sources, Strauss died in a hospice Tuesday morning.

Per the site, the aspiring model decided to stop chemotherapy at the end of October, and in November, Strauss shared on Facebook that she was spending her first night in a hospice.

“So many things I never knew about life. Or death. So many things,” she wrote at the time.

On October 4th, Strauss told fans about her cancer diagnosis in a heartbreaking social media post, saying that it has been determined “incurable.”

“I was gonna write some long thing but some of you guys deserve to know,” she wrote on Facebook just a few days ahead of Brest Cancer Awareness month.

“On October 2nd I was diagnosed with stage IV breast cancer. It has aggressively spread throughout my body and is incurable.”

She continued: “With treatment, it may prolong my life longer than the ‘few months’ doctors said I could make it. I don’t want to die. I need another one of those miracles that I got back in 2013.”

Strauss, who appeared on Season 8 of the reality show, later confirmed she had progressive metastatic inflammatory breast cancer.

A GoFundMe page was set up on Strauss’ behalf in October to help with her medical expenses.

Fox News’ Morgan Evans contributed to this report. 

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Cardi B says she and Offset have called it quits, he declares “y’all won” – The A.V. Club

Offset and Cardi B
Photo: Steve Granitz (Getty Images)

With the glitter-encrusted wreckage of Ariana Grande and Pete Davidson’s short-lived romance still smoldering, we bid adieu to another ubiquitous pop culture couple. “Bodak Yellow” rapper Cardi B and Migos’ Offset, who tied the knot last September, have officially called it quits. The couple have a daughter together, Kulture Kiari Cephus, who was born in July.

Cardi shared the news via Instagram, where she only referred to the rapper as “my daughter’s father.” Saying that “things just haven’t been working out between us for a long time,” she concluded that the couple “grew out of love.” She maintains that the pair will remain friends, and also adds that “it might take time to get a divorce.”

The split follows a New York Times profile of Offset that paints Cardi as a stabilizing force in his life. “The difference that I’ve seen in him lately is that he’s in an adoring, loving relationship,” said his lawyer, Drew Findling. Later, Offset said that settling down has been “the best thing that’s happened to me personally, which helps me make the music, which helps my career.” He also hinted at a collaborative album between the two. “We haven’t even dropped an album yet. That’s a whole other realm.”

Of course, that album could very well happen, what with Cardi specifically mentioning the pair’s business relationship in her video. In fact, the Times goes so far as to say that “business is the couple’s romance language.”

But there are signs that Offset isn’t so happy about the split. As Complex points out in the below tweet, the rapper commented on Cardi’s video, saying, “y’all won.” Oof.

The Migos rapper’s debut solo album drops on December 14.

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Mexico’s new leader says relations with Trump are ‘good’ – AOL

MEXICO CITY (AP) — Mexico’s leftist new president said Wednesday that relations with U.S. President Donald Trump are “good,” and the two will probably talk soon about the immigration issue.

Many analysts had been expecting President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador to run into headlong conflict with Trump, especially since a caravan of about 7,000 Central American migrants set up camp on the U.S. border last month. The caravan’s presence, and an attempt to cross the border en masse, led Trump to threaten to close the border.

But Lopez Obrador said he is hopeful the two sides can agree on development aid for Central America and southern Mexico to create jobs so people won’t have to emigrate.

“We are in constant communication, and the communication is good,” Lopez Obrador said Wednesday “Relations are good.”

“It is very likely that in coming days we will talk with President Donald Trump about this issue in particular, the immigration issue,” he said.

Mexico’s Foreign Relations Secretary Marcelo Ebrard has been in Washington for talks on the issue.

But Lopez Obrador sidestepped questions about whether Mexico will agree to house migrants while their asylum claims are processed in the United State, as U.S. officials have reportedly proposed.

See more related to this story:

18 PHOTOS

A day in the life of the migrant caravan in Mexico

See Gallery

Glenda Escobar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands from Central America en route to the United States, takes a rest on the road, as she walks to Pijijiapan from Mapastepec, Mexico, October 25, 2018. Picture taken October 25, 2018. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands from Central America en route to the United States, rests on the road with her son Adonai, as they make their way to Pijijiapan from Mapastepec, Mexico, October 25, 2018. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino/File photo SEARCH “GLENDA ESCOBAR” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

Glenda Escobar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands from Central America en route to the United States, plays with her son Adonai in San Pedro Tapanatepec, Mexico October 28, 2018. Picture taken October 28, 2018. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands from Central America en route to the United States, sleeps in San Pedro Tapanatepec, Mexico October 28, 2018. Picture taken October 28, 2018. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands from Central America en route to the United States, poses for a photograph with her children Adonai and Denzel in San Pedro Tapanatepec, Mexico October 28, 2018. Picture taken October 28, 2018. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands from Central America en route to the United States, smiles as she rests in San Pedro Tapanatepec, Mexico October 28, 2018. Picture taken October 28, 2018. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands from Central America en route to the United States, poses with her son Denzel, 8, as they rest in San Pedro Tapanatepec, Mexico October 28, 2018. Picture taken October 28, 2018. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands from Central America en route to the United States, rests in San Pedro Tapanatepec, Mexico October 28, 2018. Picture taken October 28, 2018. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands from Central America en route to the United States, rests on the road with her son Denzel as they walk to Pijijiapan from Mapastepec, Mexico, October 25, 2018. Picture taken October 25, 2018. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

Glenda Escobar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands from Central America en route to the United States, prepares the sleeping place after arriving at a makeshift camp with her sons Adonai and Denzel, in San Pedro Tapanatepec, Mexico October 28, 2018. Picture taken October 28, 2018. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Denzel, 8, holds his brother Adonai, 5, near their mother Glenda Escobar, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands from Central America en route to the United States, as they walk to Pijijiapan from Mapastepec, Mexico, October 25, 2018. Picture taken October 25, 2018. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands from Central America en route to the United States, prepares the sleeping place after arriving at a makeshift camp with her sons Adonai and Denzel, in San Pedro Tapanatepec, Mexico October 28, 2018. Picture taken October 28, 2018. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands from Central America en route to the United States, cries after talking on the phone, in San Pedro Tapanatepec, Mexico October 28, 2018. Picture taken October 28, 2018. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands from Central America en route to the United States, rests on the road, on her way to Pijijiapan from Mapastepec, Mexico, October 25, 2018. Picture taken October 25, 2018. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands from Central America en route to the United States, poses for a photograph as she rests in San Pedro Tapanatepec, Mexico October 28, 2018. Picture taken October 28, 2018. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands from Central America en route to the United States, takes a ride in a vintage car with her children Adonai and Denzel, as they walk to Pijijiapan from Mapastepec, Mexico, October 25, 2018. Picture taken October 25, 2018. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Adonai, 5, son of Glenda Escobar, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands from Central America en route to the United States, smiles as he rests in San Pedro Tapanatepec, Mexico October 28, 2018. Picture taken October 28, 2018. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands from Central America en route to the United States, prepares the sleeping place after arriving at a makeshift camp with her children Adonai and Denzel, in Pijijiapan, Mexico, October 25, 2018. Picture taken October 25, 2018. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

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Still in his first week in office, Lopez Obrador also said he is weighing what steps to take in regard to his extremely loose personal security arrangements, which have been widely criticized.

“We are looking at this issue,” the president said, “My friends, family, civic activists, you (the press) are constantly bringing it to my attention.”

Lopez Obrador holds news conferences every morning, and at Tuesday’s conference, an activist snuck in among the journalists and ran up to Lopez Obrador at the end of the conference to present him with a petition.

A staffer shadowed the woman but did not stop her from reaching the president, who accepted the papers she gave him, and gave her a hug and a peck on the cheek.

Reporters have to pass through a metal detector to enter the National Palace, where the conferences are held, but Lopez Obrador routinely shakes hands in crowds where there are no such security filters.

“I don’t feel or perceive any threat,” he said. “I think anybody who fights for justice has nothing to fear.”

Lopez Obrador thrives on contact with common people and crowds; he has dismissed the military presidential guard corps and has set in motion plans to sell the presidential jet and flies economy class.

“I don’t want to lose the relationship with the people, with the citizenry, I don’t want a fence around me,” Lopez Obrador said.

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U.K. Releases Internal Facebook Emails Deliberating Selling Data – Wall Street Journal

Lawmakers in the U.K. released about 250 pages of internal Facebook Inc. emails that they said show how executives, including Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg, gave some third-party developers preferential access to user data and contemplated charging developers for data access.

The documents were released Wednesday as British lawmakers examine Facebook’s use of data.

In…

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U.S. Markets Are Closed but the Selloff Continues – Barron’s

U.S. Markets Are Closed but the Selloff Continues


Michael Haddad

Text size

Gone Dark. Markets are closed on Wednesday, but Tuesday’s bloodbath continued, with losses around the world on fading hopes for a resolution to the U.S.-China trade dispute. In today’s Intraday Update, we…

  • …watch global markets slide;
  • …review the trade and Treasury factors spooking investors; and
  • …look for signs of hope.

Worry & Wait

While U.S. markets are closed on Wednesday, worries about American trade with China continue to weigh heavily on the world stage.

Asian markets are already closed, with Japan’s Nikkei Stock Average ending down 0.5%, while Hong Kong’s Hang Seng Index fell 1.6%. The Stoxx Europe 600 was down 1.1% in recent trading. Perhaps if U.S. exchanges had been open, we might have regained some ground. Futures pointed to a 0.6% rise for the
S&P 500
and a 0.5% gain for the
Dow Jones Industrial Average.
As it is, however, global markets remain in the red.

Words like market ‘selloff’, ‘crash’, ‘meltdown’, and ‘correction’ have been bandied about by traders and analysts in ways that can make investors cringe. Here’s what you need to know.

While investors originally reacted positively to the cease-fire that came out of the G20 summit over the weekend the appointment of known hardliner Robert Lighthizer to spearhead the negotiations suggests they won’t be a cakewalk.

“The U.S. and China are a long way from a final trade deal. Markets are likely to react to headlines on progress being made on trade or not,” writes SunTrust’s Keith Lerner. “However, we still view the cease-fire as a net positive on a short-term basis as enactment of additional tariffs are delayed, allowing additional time for negotiation.”

Unfortunately, it’s not just tariffs that are worrying markets: Bonds are also an issue, as the 10-year U.S. Treasury yield continues to drift lower below 3%, a sign of increased worry about economic growth. Yields on both the two- and three-year Treasuries are above the five-year T-note for the first time since the recession.

“While this is not an indicator of an immediate recession, it does signal that the U.S. economy is in the later stage of the business cycle,” writes Allianz Investment Management’s Charlie Ripley. “With regards to an inverted Treasury yield curve signaling a recession, the Federal Reserve believes a more appropriate indicator would be the spread between three-month Treasury Bills and 10-year Treasury notes. Thus, while the inversion between the two-year and five-year point of the Treasury curve is notable, the spread between three-month Treasury bills and the 10-year U.S. Treasury is still 50 basis points and it could be many months before we see that point of the curve invert.”

Recent volatility may have gobbled away much of the market’s 2018 returns, and with a less robust growth outlook for 2019, it’s understandable that investors are nervous. Nonetheless, as we approach the 10th anniversary of the bull market, the silver lining is that the recent selloffs have made stocks cheaper. Fortune favors the bold, and long-term investors who can overcome their fears have a chance to buy stocks on the cheap.

“A great company whose stock price falls 40% is likely going to provide much more in returns the next 10 years than if it hadn’t declined in price,” writes Smead Capital Markets’ Bill Smead. “In every other facet of commerce, lower prices are considered a good thing…What a stock price does in the short run doesn’t matter in 10 years. How well the underlying company does and how attractively you bought [it] determines the long-run returns.”

Happy shopping.

Write to Teresa Rivas at teresa.rivas@barrons.com

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